Sunday, September 28, 2008

New fantasy Painted Skin hits Hong Kong screens

Hong Kong cinema fan-fave director Gordon Chan is back! He’s probably best known for the 1994 Jet Li-starrer, Fist of Legend, a remake of the Bruce Lee classic Fist of Fury.

This time he’s tackling a classic literary horror-fantasy by author Liao Zhai, and trading chop-socky for a ghostly atmosphere. Entitled Painted Skin, this new release focuses on a long-ago general who rescues a stunning beauty from the clutches of some evil barbarians, only to find that her glamorous looks are maintained by some unusual appetite demands. The damsel with the dark secret is played by gorgeous Chinese actress Zhou Xun, but the real reason to get pumped to see this movie, in my opinion, is co-star Donnie Yen, who traded blows with Jet Li in the amazing classic Once Upon a Time in China II. Word on the street is that this pic is more romance that actioner, but that’s okay by me. I like Hong Kong fantasy romances with a touch of martial arts, a la 1993’s ravishing Bride With White Hair, so if Painted Skin even comes close to that genre fave, I’ll be happy.

You can check out an English-subtitled trailer for Painted Skin here. No word on possible U.S. distribution as of yet, so if you want to see this in the States, you’ll probably have to wait for a Chinese DVD release.

Source: http://smashcut.today.com/2008/09/28/new-fantasy-painted-skin-hits-hong-kong-screens/

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Painted Skin - Zhou Xun: "the demon is not absolutely evil"

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Chinese horror films are not known for being particularly terrifying, but in a new release out Friday, director Gordon Chan pushes the boundaries. The spooky thing is, it's a love story, writes Xu Wei.

In the absence of a movie rating system, Chinese movie buffs generally have mixed feelings about domestic horror films.

Perhaps it's because most scary films in China have failed to create a really bone-chilling atmosphere in cinemas.

Maybe that has something to do with the fact that parents take their children to see these shows, resulting in excessive elements of the supernatural and horror being watered down by movie makers.

In that sense, shooting the costume thriller "Painted Skin" certainly presented a tough challenge for Hong Kong director Gordon Chan.

The US$15 million budgeted film starring Hong Kong action idol Donnie Yen, mainland heartthrob Chen Kun and actresses Zhou Xun, Sun Li and Vicki Zhao is set for release on Friday throughout China, Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand.

"This film is not made specifically for the sole purpose of terror," says Chan, known for police films like "Beast Cops" and "The Medallion." "Instead, you will find more tears than fears."

Chan's aim was to lead the audience through a tragic yet beautiful love story set in ancient China, a story based on a popular ghost tale by Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) writer Pu Songling.

Pu is famous for his novel "Liaozhai Zhiyi," ("Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio"), a Qing-era collection of supernatural stories.

One of them, "Painted Skin," centers on a vampire-like woman who eats the skin and hearts of humans.

Zhou plays the fox demon in painted human skin trying to eat humans. However, she falls in love with General Wang Sheng (Chen). Wang's wife (Zhao) then resorts to ghost-catchers to save her husband.

"In my eyes, the love triangle involving the two women and a man is the soul of the story," Chan says. "Pu's original novel is not all about ghosts. It provides an insight into personalities, ethics and delicate human relations."

Throughout the film, Zhou appears in dozens of different costumes to show off her charm and witchcraft.

Sun, who is better known for playing tender females, challenges Zhou in her role as a swordswoman.

"I take on a more masculine look in a black hat and coarse cloth," Sun says with a grin. "My former training in dancing helped me to master the martial arts scenes."

Sun notes that Chan managed to explore her potential for some other roles. Her ghost-catcher character experiences the hard psychological process from hatred to forgiveness.

As for Zhou, the challenge was to grasp the emotions, reactions and posture of a fox demon.

"I had to imagine myself being an animal," Zhou says. "Moreover, the demon is not absolutely evil. She has a juvenile attitude about love. I am glad that the ending of the movie is hopeful, not that cruel. The character finally gives up something for the sake of her lover."

Zhou's impressive performance in the new romance film "The Equation of Love and Death" has also brought her wide acclaim. In the offbeat love story, Zhou plays an ordinary cab driver who spends four years searching for her missing fiance.

The cinematography for "Painted Skin" was handled by award-winning Hong Kong cinematographer Arthur Wong, best known for his work in "The Warlords" and "Temptation Of A Monk."

Unlike many other ghost films, Wong bravely applies striking and lively color to create an eery and "inauthentic" ambience. "What we're trying to present is a non-traditional thriller," he says.

Source: http://english.northeast.cn/system/2008/09/25/000081518.shtml

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"Painted Skin" sets box office record

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With 15.2 million Yuan after the first showing day in China, Painted Skin passes "The Assembly" (15 million Yuan) and "War Lord" (10 million Yuan), sets box office record.

This is a really suprise result because the released day, September 26th, wasn't a holiday. In addition, the showing was earlier than the schedule (September 28th)inconisitent with many audiences' plans.

Next week is Chinese's Golden Week, box office will inrease, hoped that can reach the number of 200 million Yuan.

Date: September 28th 2008
Source: ent.sina.com.cn
Etrans: mylove @ zhouxun.chungta.com

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Saturday, September 27, 2008

Painted Skin ( Wa Pei) Review

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Based upon the classic literature of Liao Zai, Painted Skin is an adaptation of one of the stories that dwell on fox spirits. If you're someone expecting either a supernatural spook fest, or an amalgamation of ghosts and kung fu, you might be disappointed to find out that it's actually a romance through and through, with complicated relationships all around that you can weave a complex web of love and lust amongst the players involved.

Chen Kun plays Wang Sheng, a general whose army recently overrun the camp of a group of barbarians. In their battle, he rescues a beautiful girl from the grasp of the enemy, and brings her home out of pity and suggestive lust, given that she looks like Zhou Xun. OK, so Zhou Xun plays Xiao Wei, who unknowing to everyone else, is a fox spirit (touted always as beautiful beings in their human form) with an appetite for human hearts in order to maintain her beauty and youth.

Thus begins a tussle for General Wang's heart by both Xiao Wei and Vicky Zhao's Pei Rong, who is the dutiful and demure wife of Wang Sheng. Pei Rong is indeed wary and beginning to suspect Xiao Wei's supernatural abilities when a spate of killings surface with her arrival, but with no proof, Xiao Wei starts to sow discord between the man and wife in order to try and become the new Mrs Wang. It's quite an interesting attempt through the characters to tell of the varying degrees and types of love, one of possession in Xiao Wei's ruthless means to reach her objective, and one of sacrificing for the love and well being of the other half, as established through Pei Rong's selfless courage.

But that's not all. Throw in Donnie Yen as an ex-general Pang Yong, who also shares the hots for Pei Rong, and one time rival of Wang Sheng for her affections, a bumbling lowly ghostbuster Xia Bin (Sun Li) who is in possession of a fabled mythical weapon (opportunity to show off some special effects here, and quite a sight to behold too in its temporal usage) and denying her affections for Pang Yong, and Qi Yuwu as a lizard spirit whose infatuation with Xiao Wei ensures that she gets her fair share of food without the need to get her hands dirty. Connected the dots yet?

Fans of Donnie Yen will probably be a tad disappointed by his limited screen appearance, and for the most parts he's either playing the joker, where his jokes will likely be lost in translation, going by the English subtitles that didn't manage to truly capture the essence of his lines, and the remaining screen time having to see him execute some action, but nothing groundbreaking and not seen before. We know what Donnie Yen can do, and perhaps in seeking some form of redemption, the story has a flashback scene where he dons armor yet again (anyone remember the dismal result of An Empress And Her Warriors) and does battle in a scene which Jackie Chan has already stamped his authority on in The Myth.

One could have expected the Gordon Chan is familiar with shooting decent action sequences, but you don't really get a lot of that in Painted Skin, save for some generic rooftop chase in the night, and a be all and end all finale where no punches got pulled, though it really got marred by all the tight shots that all you'd probably get to see is a blur. The narrative also got a little choppy in the mid section, and you do feel that a huge chunk of detail got summarized to keep it running generously under two hours, with subplots dropped that I suspect involved the growing affection and admiration between Pang Yong and Xia Bin, in order not to distract the audience from the main love triangle of Pang Yong, Xiao Wei and Pei Rong.

All in all, this is recommended for Zhou Xun's face off with Zhao Wei, especially with the former playing the temptress role to perfection. The last where we saw two prominent Chinese actresses square off was between Zhang Ziyi and Gong Li in Memoirs of a Geisha. Otherwise, Painted Skin held a lot of promise, but didn't deliver that level of oomph in its final product, lapsing into mediocrity throughout.

Source: http://anutshellreview.blogspot.com/2008/09/painted-skin-wa-pei.html

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‘Painted Skin’ opens across Asia

By Mark Pollard • September 26, 2008

Director Gordon Chan’s period thriller PAINTED SKIN arrives in Asian theaters this week. It’s the latest screen adaptation from a collection of supernatural romance stories by Liao Zhai, previously adapted into the Hong Kong classic A CHINESE GHOST STORY, as well as King Hu’s PAINTED SKIN. Contrary to what folks might think with Donnie Yen in armor being prominently displayed in the promotional art, this is not another action-oriented martial arts or wuxia movie

Zhou Xun is a vampire-like woman who eats the skins and hearts of her lovers. She is discovered by a military commander (Chen Kun) and falls in love with him. SHAOLIN SOCCER starlet Zhao Wei is the faithful wife to the commander who discovers the demon’s real identity and intentions and recruits a former general (Donnie Yen) and a “ghostbuster” to get rid of her.

So far, Chan’s film has been met with mixed reviews. Here’s a brief sampling.

“Fans of Donnie Yen will probably be a tad disappointed by his limited screen appearance … PAINTED SKIN held a lot of promise, but didn’t deliver that level of oomph in its final product, lapsing into mediocrity throughout.” - A Nutshell Review

“What audiences would be most impressed with are Zhou [Xun] and Zhao’s impressive performance as the vixen spirit and the devoted wife respectively … Watch out for the scene where the two women confront each other – the determination and relentless of the two characters are inaudibly explosive.” - MovieXclusive

Source: http://www.kungfucinema.com/?p=3113

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Friday, September 26, 2008

Painted Skin: the good, the bad and the ugly

From the ancient Chinese Classic Ghost Stories (or Liao Zhai) comes the new Asian film, Painted Skin.

Painted Skin stars Chen Kun as General Wang Sheng. While leading his soldiers in a bandit raid, he rescues a beautiful woman from the bandit’s lair. Little does he know that that woman, Xiao Wei, played by Zhou Xun, is actually a fox spirit that has taken on the form of a human





The fox demon needs to consume human hearts to maintain this shapeshift and the job of finding her the supply lies with Xiao Yi, a chameleon spirit played by Qi Yu Wu.

Inevitably, Xiao Yi also falls for the beautiful Xiao Wei and carries out a series of murders to provide her with fresh human hearts in his futile attempts to prove his love for her. There's one slight problem: Xiao Wei has already fallen for the brave general and attempts to steal him from the general’s wife, Pei Rong (Vicki Zhao)

Meanwhile, Pei Rong suspects that Xiao Wei is not human and that she is in love with General Wang Sheng. She then approaches martial art exponent Pang Yong (Donnie Yen) and demon slayer Xia Bing (Sun Li) to help her find out the truth.

The Good…
The movie offers an exciting array of fighting scenes for the action packed lovers. Together with the brilliant plot that is propelled mostly by Pei Rong’s sacrificial love, these two elements created an exciting yet extremely touching film.

The film provides an intricate mix of lust and love in the relationships in the movie. It leaves you to wonder whether each relationship in the movie is one based on lust or love and often forces you to rethink as the story progresses.





A little bit of magic, demons in love with humans, humans in love with other humans, good fighting scenes, a tear jerking storyline… these make up a perfect solution for a nice Liao Zhai adaptation.

I also loved how the movie did not use too many scenes with demons practising magic. This revolutionary style of execution is definitely a more modern and realistic story compared to other adaptations


The story also had a good twist at the end.

The Bad…
Towards the end of the movie with the heartwrenching unveiling of the truth, the unfortunate timing of a few sadistically funny scenes prior to that killed the perfect moment. It was a real turnoff.

If not for the speed at which the seriousness was brought back, it would have spoilt the movie at the best parts.

Till the end of the story I still could not figure out why the English title is Painted Skin. Does it refer to the fa├žades that the demons put on, or does its true meaning allude to the superficiality of the various characters’ love for one another?



I rest that case and leave you to decide for yourself.

The Ugly…
The scaly skin makeup on Qi Yu Wu’s forehead — self-explanatory.

Source: http://www.youth.sg/content/view/6123/52/

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Fatal attraction in Painted Skin

Vixen’s beauty captures the hearts of men in Painted Skin.

A vampire-like woman who devours the hearts of her lovers and wears their skins in order to retain her human form. That is the premise of director Gordon Chan (The Medallion) and action director Stephen Tung’s (Accidental Spy, Hero) supernatural-action-thriller, Painted Skin.

Painted Skin is one of the spookiest stories about vixen spirits, ghosts, scholars and Taoist exorcists from a collection of short stories in Strange Tales of Liaozhai by Pu Songling (a renowned Qing Dynasty writer).

It is also the first movie with ghostly elements to be approved by SARFT (State Administration of Radio, Film & Television) China for production





The story sees Commander Wang Sheng (Chen Kun) leading his troops in a raid on bandits in the desert. He chances upon the beautiful Xiao Wei (Zhou Xun) and brings her back with them.

However, he has no idea that Xiao Wei is, in fact, a fox spirit in human form who needs a regular supply of human hearts to maintain her human form.

Meanwhile, Xiao Wei has fallen in love with Wang Sheng and will do anything to take him away from his wife Pei Rong (Zhao Wei). When Pei Rong learns of Xiao Wei’s true form, she secretly seeks help from martial arts expert Pang Rong (Donnie Yen) and demon catcher Xia Bing (Sun Li). Thus, ensues the battle between good and evil as the central characters engage in an emotional turmoil of love, passion, temptation and treachery.

Now is your chance to catch Painted Skin for free as RAM Entertainment and PMP Entertainment are giving away tickets. To gain entry, just bring along this article (original copy) and make your way to the cinema foyer at GSC Mid Valley, Kuala Lumpur, tomorrow (Sept 24) to redeem two tickets.

The redemption counter is open from 8pm and each person can only redeem two tickets. Please note that the tickets are given out on a first come-first-served basis.

The movie opens in Malaysian cinemas on Friday.

Source: http://star-ecentral.com/news/story.asp?file=/2008/9/23/movies/2065698&sec=movies

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When love goes horribly wrong




CHINESE horror films are not known for being particularly terrifying, but in a new release out tomorrow, director Gordon Chan pushes the boundaries. The spooky thing is, it's a love story, writes Xu Wei.

In the absence of a movie rating system, Chinese movie buffs generally have mixed feelings about domestic horror films.

Perhaps it's because most scary films in China have failed to create a really bone-chilling atmosphere in cinemas.

Maybe that has something to do with the fact that parents take their children to see these shows, resulting in excessive elements of the supernatural and horror being watered down by movie makers.

In that sense, shooting the costume thriller "Painted Skin" certainly presented a tough challenge for Hong Kong director Gordon Chan.

The US$15 million budgeted film starring Hong Kong action idol Donnie Yen, mainland heartthrob Chen Kun and actresses Zhou Xun, Sun Li and Vicki Zhao is set for release tomorrow throughout China, Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand.

"This film is not made specifically for the sole purpose of terror," says Chan, known for police films like "Beast Cops" and "The Medallion." "Instead, you will find more tears than fears."

Chan's aim was to lead the audience through a tragic yet beautiful love story set in ancient China, a story based on a popular ghost tale by Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) writer Pu Songling.

Pu is famous for his novel "Liaozhai Zhiyi," ("Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio"), a Qing-era collection of supernatural stories.

One of them, "Painted Skin," centers on a vampire-like woman who eats the skin and hearts of humans.

Zhou plays the fox demon in painted human skin trying to eat humans. However, she falls in love with General Wang Sheng (Chen). Wang's wife (Zhao) then resorts to ghost-catchers to save her husband.

Source: http://www.shanghaidaily.com/article/?id=374853&type=Feature

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Hong Kong gives Oscar nod to "Painted Skin"

Written by Marcus Lim
Wednesday, 24 September 2008


HONG KONG — Hong Kong has selected the Donnie Yen starrer "Painted Skin" (Wa pei) as the territory’s contender for this year’s foreign-language Oscar.

Selection was announced Wednesday on the website of China Film Group and confirmed by Hong Kong's Federation of Motion Film Producers (FMFP) at a later press conference.

"We think this film has something very special," FMFP chair Crucindo Hung said. "It is a very interesting portrayal of Chinese culture that is different to the usual."

Pic, an action-thriller centered on a vampire-like woman who eats the skins and hearts of her lovers, was helmed by Gordon Chan ("The Medallion.")

Pic was initially skedded for an Oct. 2 bow in Hong Kong, but had its release date moved forward to Sept. 24 in order to comply with Academy regs requiring a minimum seven-day local theatrical release before the nomination closing date of Oct. 1.

"The MPIA was asking us if we were ready to release 'Painted Skin' earlier," said Kathy Lan, head of Golden Sun Films, one of the pic's production companies. "At the same time, because the film will be released in China, Singapore and Thailand on the 26th, we thought it best to bring the Hong Kong theatrical release in line with these territories."

The nomination comes after a month-long guessing game between local press and the MPIA. In August, MPIA chairman Crucindo Hung indicated that the nomination would go to Chen Kaige’s upcoming "Mei Lan Fang." The claim was refuted by the director, who said that the pic would not be completed before the Oct. 1 deadline, and by Hong Kong's Emperor Motion Picture, which has a minority stake held in the film.

Nominated films from the region have had a history of cutting it close to the Academy deadline for foreign-language film submissions. In order to qualify for the Oscar nomination, Chen's "The Promise" was screened for a week in September 2005 in Chengdu ahead of its nationwide Dec. 15 release.

Other films on the MPIA's shortlist included last year's Jet Li starrer "The Warlords" and "Connected," the Benny Chan-helmed remake of the 2004 Hollywood thriller "Cellular."

Source: http://www.varietyasiaonline.com/content/view/7006/1/

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Sunday, September 21, 2008

More Tears than Fears in "Painted Skin"

2008-09-16 14:56:33 CRIENGLISH.com

A press conference was held on Monday to announce the world premiere of Gordon Chan's "Painted Skin" in Guangzhou, south China's Guangdong Province, sina.com reports.

The movie's star-studded cast that includes Hong Kong action star Donnie Yen and mainland actors Vicky Zhao, Zhou Xun, Betty Sun and Chen Kun, were all present at the event.

To be released in September, Painted Skin is believed to be a horror film with a romantic twist. At the press conference, film director Gordan Chan said that the audiences who expect the film to be a typical horror movie are in for a surprise.

However, some media raised an eyebrow saying movie buffs expecting to see a thriller may be disappointed when it turns out to be a love story.

A highlight of the film is that its actors will be breaking free from typecasting to portray distinctly different characters than they normally play

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Saturday, September 13, 2008

"The Equation of Love and Death" wins praises

Although "The Equation of Love and Death" (aka Li Mi's Guess in Chinese) will officially released on 19th this month, yesterday the movie was previewed for the media in Guangzhou. Receiving low investment, but the movie is logical, its story is very interesting, especially Zhou Xun's acting has many changes. All make the movie worth seeing. After the showing, the media gave the movie 4 stars (perfect with 5 stars).

Some pictures of the movie













Date: 09/14/08
Source in Chinese: zhouxun.tv
E-trans: mylove28@zhouxun.chungta.com

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Friday, September 12, 2008

"Painted Skin" Pictures

Painted Skin will be widely shown on September 26th in China.

Below are some pictures of Jue (as Xiao Wei) in the movie.



In the movie, Xiao Wei as a fox demon, but after taking off the skin, she becomes a beautiful woman. This is the skin which is very thin, especially for the scene of taking off the skin. Its raw material was purchased in America, then transported to China. The skin did not have hair, so it took the team several months to collect babies' hair that is so smooth.













Credit: zhouxun.tv

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Tuesday, September 09, 2008

In the mood for love

By Liu Wei (China Daily)
Updated: 2008-09-10 07:48


Actress Zhou Xun is set to dominate city cinema screens in the days to come and will show the many facets of love through three vastly different roles.

In The Equation of Love and Death (Li Mi de Caixiang), which opens on Sept 19, she plays a taxi driver who spends four years searching for her missing boyfriend; in The Painted Skin (Hua Pi) which kicks off later this month, she plays a pretty ghost who thinks she can control love; and in the romantic comedy Not All Women are Bad (Nuren Buhuai) which opens in December, she plays Fanfan, a girl exploring a "love elixir" to find Mr Right.

So, what is love? The roles Zhou plays provide the answers.

Li Mi's life revolves around the search for her missing boyfriend and she drives through Yunnan's zig-zag mountain roads, showing her boyfriend's photo to every passer-by, in a desperate bid for some clue.

The character reflects Zhou's own search for love. Director Li Shaohong, who has teamed up with her in many projects, says Zhou is someone who has been molded by her relationships and acting experience.

When in her early 20s, Zhou left her hometown in Zhejiang province to follow her boyfriend, then a rock singer, to Beijing.

She made a living by singing at small bars, earning about 150 yuan ($22) every night before Chen Kaige picked her up for some minor roles in his projects. But Zhou does not see herself as a beipiao, or someone who leaves his or her hometown for Beijing with dreams of stardom.

"They come to Beijing for a career break, I came for love," she says. "That's totally different."

Her devotion to the person she loves matches that of the character she plays. Her relationships, unlike most stars, are never low-key. Every time she falls in love, she makes her boyfriend known to the media and her fans.

"Li Mi's passion for love is similar to mine," she says. "I have that part too - sometimes it is hidden somewhere inside my heart, sometimes it jumps out I am happy I still have that part. By sharing my experience, I can help more people believe in love. Even if only one or two couples are moved by us, it would be a good thing."

But her wide publicity of her relationships has caused her deep hurt. While she was still with her last boyfriend, actor Li Yapeng, now husband of diva Faye Wong, she told the media that he satisfied all her fantasies about men.

They soon broke up.

Zhou was plunged into a depression for nearly two years. She seldom laughed or even talked during that period, but never spoke harshly about Li or the relationship. When she met her current boyfriend, Taiwan stylist Li Da-chih, she was once again her sweet and chirpy self. She even named one of her songs in her last album, Da-chih.

Tolerance in love is something she shares with the character Xiaowei, in the action thriller The Painted Skin.

Xiaowei is a jealous and mean vampire who falls in love with a human being. She finally realizes love is more about tolerance than control, after seeing the relationship the man shares with his wife.



"Xiaowei's story is about one's understanding of love," says Zhou. "She finally learns that to love is to give in, despite the price you pay. If I was full of rage over my last break-up, I would not have met my current boyfriend."

Talking about her role in Not All Women are Bad, she says she yearns for love just as Fanfan does, but would never try to find a "love elixir," because love is not a puzzle to solve. One must let a relationship go its own course, she says.

"I am eager to love all the time," she says. "I hope I can still exchange a loving look with my husband when we are very old. But I will not manipulate love. My father always told me to let things be, and this is the motto of my life."

Source: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/cndy/2008-09/10/content_7013050.htm

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16 films selected for New Directors Award at the 56th San Sebastian International Film Festival

Festival selects 16 films for New Directors Award

By Pamela Rolfe

Aug 22, 2008, 05:11 PM ET
MADRID -- The Argentinian romantic comedy "Lovely Loneliness" and U.S. titles "Frozen River" and "Letters From Death Row" will vie with 13 other films for the coveted New Directors Award at the 56th San Sebastian International Film Festival, organizers said Friday.

The 90,000 euro ($133,000) prize, to be split between the director and the Spanish distributor of the film, has helped launch some of international filmmaking's hottest fresh faces over the years.

This year's lineup is true to form, emphasizing such hard-hitting subjects as crime, drugs, old-age loneliness, missing children and prison life.

Courtney Hunt's "Frozen River, the Grand Jury prizewinner at Sundance this year, and Belen Macias' previously announced "My Prison Yard" will compete for the New Directors Award while also screening in the official competition.

One of the most anticipated titles is "Death Row," Chinese-American Kevin Feng Ke's directorial debut, a look at a maximum security Chinese prison through the eyes of the man assigned to record the prisoners' last will.

Arno Dierickx's "Blood Brothers," based on a real-life 1960s murder, and Cao Baoping's crime drama "The Equation of Love and Death" also made the cut.

The festival, which previously announced the Spanish titles in the section, is set for Sept. 18-27.

The films selected for 2008 are:
"Amateurs," Gabriel Velazquez, Spain
"Lovely Loneliness" (Amorosa Soledad), Martin Carranza, Victoria Galardi, Argentina
"Letters From Death Row" (Ba Bai Bang), Kevin Feng Ke, China-U.S.
"Blood Brothers" (Bloedbroeders), Arno Dierickx, Netherlands
"Ordinary Boys" (Chicos Normales), Daniel Hernandez, Spain
"Insignificant Things" (Cosas Insignificantes), Andrea Martinez Crowther, Mexico-Spain
"Derriere Moi," Rafael Ouellet, Canada
"Noise" (Entre Os Dedos), Tiago Guedes, Frederico Serra, Portugal-Brazil
"The Firm Land," Chapour Haghighat, Iran-France-India
"The Equation Of Love And Death" (Li Mi De Cai Xiang), Cao Baoping, China-Hong Kong
"Passion," Ryusuke Hamaguchi, Japan
"Thomas," Miika Soini, Finland
"El Truco Del Manco," Santiago Zannou, Spain
"Unspoken" (Le Non Dit), Fien Troch, Belgium-The Netherlands
Other Official Selection films eligible For The New Directors Award:
"Frozen River," Courtney Hunt, U.S.
"My Prison Yard" (El Patio De Mi Carcel), Belen Macias, Spain

Source: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/content_display/awards_festivals/news/e3if8116569e5fd87e48ded1fe20418c4bc

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Monday, September 08, 2008

"Painted Skin" theme song

Theme song of "Painted Skin" (Jue's new movie that will be shown on September 26th), available now, performed by Jane Zhang.

Download: http://www.hotlinkfiles.com/files/1849536_talwp/21802835.flv

Online:


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